Archive | April, 2012

OK sometimes it really is grapefruit I can taste!!!

24 Apr

Well, yesterday I was blethering on about that elusive grapefruit taste in beer. I recognized the taste but didn’t really think it was grapefruit, at least not the grapefruits I eat. I’ve always known what people are referring to but it just wasn’t really grapefruit, was it?

Hopsacked with Citra Hops

Well today it really was grapefruit and it really was lemon. It wasn’t grapefruity or lemony, it was grapefruit and lemon, both on the initial smell and the tasting. The beer was OMNOM by Mallinsons Brewing Company 4.3%, who hail from Huddersfield UK. This was a winning beer for me. Very light tasting but with good body, there is some sweetness which helps with the aftertaste. It’s tart and hoppy without being too bitter.  It was a fantastic refreshing beer. All in all, I think this is one of the most enjoyable beers of the year so far for me and I hope I can get it into the summer months.

I believe OMNOM is the sound you make just after drinking it or at least it was after I was drinking it.

More like this please.

Bruegel Amber Ale 5.2% and Global Beer TV

23 Apr

Quite a low strength ale for a Belgian this one, which was quite welcome under the circumstances in which I found myself. It is fairly easy-drinking and a bit floral. It tasted a bit of what people tell me is grapefruit but I never actually taste as grapefruit. I say the word for the benefit of others who do taste grapefruit. The taste doesn’t linger long enough for me to get excited about, it could be a nice summer drink but I’d probably opt for another drink, especially if I were over here.

However, I wouldn’t even have mentioned having this if it were not for the fact that, upon looking up the history of this beer, I came across this gentleman from Global Beer TV. I’d not heard of Global Beer TV before but will look it up more often if Johnny Fincioen keeps presenting. Listening to people murdering your mother tongue as much as I do does tend to wear you out a little so it’s wonderful to hear someone speaking with an accent and enthusiasm that brings a smile to your face.

To be honest I’m not even sure if this is supposed to be a send up of an enthusiastic native Flemish speaker indulging in his beer passion in English or not. It certainly could be from a sketch show!

Check this one out – ‘Shouldjerz did not drink vater’ Classic!

The world needs more Johnnies!! In every sense.

By the Horns Brewery Open Day

23 Apr

Summerstown is a very nice name. It sounds like the name of a happy village from a charming fictional storybook. Well, the reality is quite different. It’s the crap bit that sits between Earslfield, Tooting and Wimbledon where all the pubs are boarded up and green spaces concreted over. It might be wild west country were it not for the fact that nobody lives there. It is basically a rather dated industrial estate with a dog track.

So spending a Saturday afternoon alternating between a garage-sized industrial unit and a small car park drinking beer wouldn’t appear to be the most attractive way of spending a Saturday afternoon. Just as well I didn’t do it. I arrived a bit later for an hour or so to have a brief look at what now must have become my local brewery.

By the Horns

I’ve mentioned By the Horns Brewery on here before but was unable to make their last open day. It’s been set up by two lads in their twenties (I think) called Alex and Chris, who say they saw potential in the market and just went for it. I can’t remember which one was which but the tall bloke said that he hadn’t long been into appreciating ales as such whereas the shorter one was the avid homebrewer. Together they seem to be putting their respective strengths to good use and have been making a few waves around the local area since they started production in November 2011, not even 6 months ago. I recently missed out on their beers, which also appeared at the Hope’s London Beer Festival last month, too many beers not enough of a beer gut to put it all in I’m afraid!

Menu

OPA

The open day would display (sell) some of their cask ales, some keg and their bottle-conditioned range, as one might expect a brewery to on such an occasion. They were also having some food put on from a deli in the altogether nicer part of town not 5 minutes away. Unfortunately, which is an adverb I often use when I’m describing how I never pull my finger out of my arse in time, I arrived too late for the food. And whatsmore, they’d ran out of beer!! A welcome sign indeed for the lads but not so for me! My initial fears of a wasted journey were not completely borne out, most of the bottled range was still being sold albeit a little on the warm side.

Having a little chat with the brewers was also quite nice as they were two enthusiastic and personable young men (I’m not sure I’m old enough to say that!) who spoke openly about what they were doing and appeared to have time for everyone.

The people who attended, at least while I was there, were not just the usual suspects but had quite a young bias. I only counted one beard, not that I’m knocking beards, after all they are nature’s bibs. It appears to be a good sign for the brewery as they look to (also) tap into a younger, perhaps trendier market, as may be evidenced by the 33cl bottles and branding. They also appear to be tapping into their status as a London brewer with their brews often named after something iconic, Diamond Geezer Red Ale and Lambeth Walk Porter and good luck to them.

Garage

I tried their new beer 6 X 6 Oat Pale Ale 4.4% which was pretty hoppy without being overwhelming and had a decent mouthfeel and flavour for the strength. The one I liked the most was their Bobby on the Wheat 4.7%, it didn’t ask too many questions was good in the mouth and didn’t smell of old socks. Their Diamond Geezer Red Ale 4.9% felt like it might be quite interesting but I thought that it had a touch of the vinegars about it. Stiff Upper Lip was a Pale Ale at 3.9% and was good and the most sessionable one on offer, light with a hoppy finish. I also tried a sample of the Lambeth Walk Porter and was a bit disappointed to miss out on the Doodle American Pale Ale 5.9%.

Makeshift Keg Taps

I’m glad I went. I brought home a few bottles but I think I’ll reserve judgement on the beers themselves until I’ve tried them on cask. Cask ale is a different beast after all. Considering these fellas have only being going since November, I think  it is quite exciting to think what they might end up producing for us.

Good luck to them and it’s certainly good to see a brewery in South West London again.

They have another open day on the 19th May but no details are available as yet.

I Love Tiles

22 Apr

I might be a bit weird. It’s not just beer and food that I love, I love tiles too. I love the tiles that you see forgotten between shops, tiles that you see in old pubs, tiles that you find on the floor of Victorian porches and tiles that you see down tube stations.

Tiles in the tube

I’ve no interest in bathroom tiles mind!

Things I no longer like #1

21 Apr

If being positive is all about making yourself happy, I’ve come to the realisation that moaning often makes me very happy indeed. I very much like the idea of things not being as good as they used to be as it’s something we can nearly all relate to in one way or another. We all get older after all. However, I’m going to spin that on its head and list a number of things that I used to like but don’t any more. To be fair, that’s not really spinning anything on its head but I wanted to use that phrase so I did.

Sweets

Sweets are really just poison in chewy form. I cannot imagine how I derived any pleasure from sticking a luminous rubbery hose in my mouth and masticating! Hang around groups of school kids after school and you’ll see what I mean. They stink of sweets and all have multi-coloured mouths. On second thoughts, DON’T hang around groups of school kids after school, it’s entirely inappropriate. Chocolate is not included in this category.

Shaving

When I was young, I wanted to have a five O’clock shadow more than anything else in the world, that is with the exception of a good grope with C***** P******. You’ll understand I can’t reveal details. Having stubble would be a passport into adulthood. With stubble I could buy cigarettes more easily, buy beer in the pub and more importantly finally get off with someone! I would go into the bathroom when everyone was out and try and shave the bum fluff off my face in order to stimulate more growth. Fast forward and shaving is the most boring part of the day. Even when I’m going through a positivity stage, shaving is an ordeal and expensive too! If I had a tad less self-respect and didn’t really want to maintain relationship with a woman, I might just have grown a beard by now.

Dairy Lea Cheese

Time was when I used to whoop for joy upon opening my school lunchbox and finding a silver triangle sitting there. When I used to peel apart two thin slices of bread and see the plasticky creamy stodge there, it made me feel like I’d arrived. All the other kids used to have it all the time. Mostly, I used to get this horrible, strong, ‘proper’ cheese that only grown ups liked. It used to burn my mouth!

Skin-tight Jeans

And in particular, skin-tight faded light blue jeans (don’t worry I never liked snow-washed jeans!). Everyone had them. The pleasure of squeezing your ever-growing plums into these little tubes of material and snatching yourself in the zip was one of the coolest things a growing boy could do. These days I would most likely be cautioned by the local constabulary were I to wear them.

Music Videos

Music videos were a passport into another world. A story drawing you in. Just getting a 30-second glimpse of a music video on TV was exciting back in the day. Nowadays, when I land on a music channel on the TV, the videos are all the same. Lots of people do stupid dances and make shapes with their arms behind a lead singer. The background may change but the format does not. And whatever happened to ugly pop stars, pretty people just don’t do it for me any more…… well..

Only Fools and Horses

Controversial I know, but this died a sorry death for me once Grandad left. He carried that series. Well, OK, it did have a bit more life left in it than that, but you can’t really replace a character whose middle name was Kitchener, can you? I can’t stomach watching later episodes with Cassandra and Raquel in them and as for that piss-poor Christmas special in Miami, it was like watching some you love suffering from Alzheimer’s, only not quite as bad!

Grandad AKA Edward Kitchener Rossiter

Ghostly Clerkenwell!

21 Apr

Woooah!

Clerkenwell is a ghostly place all right. At least it would be, were it ever quiet enough to be so. The nearest I ever got to it being quiet and spooky was at weekends when I used to go walking around town getting myself lost or when I used to scramble out of  the Talc Room at The Jazz Bistro’s Happiness Stan’s, Smithfields Market, at 4am on a Sunday morning not knowing which way to turn to get back home. However, there’s certainly no shortage of history in the area.

Flicking through some early digital pictures the other day, I came across this window with a much quoted paragraph stencilled onto it.

Bleedin' Hell

This is the window of the Bleeding Heart Tavern, which dates back to the 1740s as a public house. The era, I think, was the time of the gin explosion in London. You’re probably aware of William Hogarth‘s portrayal of Gin Lane and the misery and destitution therein. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on the era you refer back to, this is now a French restaurant.

Hogarth Gin Lane

It is behind said restaurant where the spooky goings-on were purported to have taken place. Bleeding Heart Yard once belonged to the Bishop of Ely before Queen Elizabeth I gave the land to one of her ‘favourites’, Sir Christopher Hatton. She may or may not have been a few sheets to the wind at the time, we all know how she enjoyed a few tankards, but give it she did. Both of those men are now immortalised in local street names, Hatton Gardens being famous for diamonds nowadays and Ely Place is famous for a) being officially part of Cambridge and b) having a really good pub on it.

As one might expect with the Queen carrying on with her husband, Hatton’s trouble and strife, Lady Hatton, got the right pip. So while Betty and Chris were getting down to the Volt, Lady Hatton decided to have her own little dance with a tall, dark stranger – the devil – and in the process just so happened to sell him her soul.

Anyway, after a while, relations with the Hattons began to improve. However, one night, when they were holding a bit of a shindig in their ballroom, who should pop along uninvited but a tall robed figure, all in black. He walked through the heaving dancefloor until he found Lady Hatton, who herself was a little too merry on meade for her own good. It was the devil himself. He took her by the hand and led her outside. All through the room the atmosphere changed in an instant, then there was a flash of lightning followed by roaring thunder as the rain started to tip down. The guests covered their ears as a spine-chilling scream shot through the room from outside.

Afterwards, all the guests ran out to the yard to see what had happened but all that they saw was a large bleeding human heart……..

Of poor Lady Hatton, it’s needless to say,
No traces have ever been found to this day,
Or the terrible dancer who whisk’d her away;
But out in the court-yard — and just in that part
Where the pump stands — lay bleeding a LARGE HUMAN HEART!
And sundry large stains
Of blood and of brains,
Which had not been wash’d off notwithstanding the rains,
Appear’d on the wood, and the handle, and chains,
As if somebody’s head with a very hard thump,
Had been recently knock’d on the top of the pump.
That pump is no more!– that of which you’ve just read,–
But they’ve put a new iron one up in its stead,
And still, it is said,
At that ‘small hour’ so dread,
When all sober people are cosey in bed,
There may sometimes be seen on a moonshiny night,
Standing close by the new pump, a Lady in White,
Who keeps pumping away with, ‘twould seem, all her might,
Though never a drop comes her pains to requite!
And hence many passengers now are debarr’d
From proceeding at nightfall through Bleeding Heart Yard!

And that, as my dear old mother would say, is as true as your trousers!

Check out the original poem here.

Otley O1 – We don’t need bubbles!!

20 Apr

I opened a bottle of Welsh brew Otley O1 today expecting a grassy light golden ale with citrus! What I got was quite different. I opened the bottle and poured out a very flat beer indeed. It was slightly darker than I expected too. I’d tried this beer before, a long time ago at the Beer Experience in Islington, but my recollection was of a very light golden ale.

To me, it was all toffee and caramel in smell and taste. What’s going on? I really liked it though and it made me wonder, do we really need carbonation at all? No head means more beer in the glass – result. On the other hand, more beer means less head and head is very saucy indeed. But whatever was going on with this particular bottle it worked out very well indeed and the flatness actually added to my enjoyment. The smoothness and toffee together were a light and slightly fruity Werthers Original, if that makes any sense to anyone other than me!! But don’t get me wrong, there was nothing heavy about it at all and if you were of that nature then you would happily sink a few of these.

I know it’s a stupid question but why aren’t more beers brewed to be served with near zero carbonation? After all, if Michael Jackson didn’t need Bubbles….

Fuller’s London Porter

17 Apr

It’s hard to choose a favourite beer but Fuller’s London Porter comes pretty close. After my recent dalliances with sorry beer that ended up down the sink I was happy to find a bottle in my beer cellar (the garage.) It didn’t let me down and I knew it wouldn’t. Some of my all time favourite pints of all time ever have been London Porter but I can’t remember the last time I had it on cask. Well, yes I can actually. It was a couple of years ago when I was doing jury service at Southwark Crown Court. I had decamped to the Royal Oak on Tabard St. in Borough, swished me way through a couple of Harvey’s offerings before settling down to some of the best pints of my life.

‘Rich, dark and complex’ says the advertising and if you know me, you’ll know I’ll struggle to add anything meaningful to those extensive tasting notes. Well, how about ‘Rich but moreish, really dark and definitely complex’? This beer is available in bottles (non-bottle conditioned) and from a keg in some Fuller’s pubs. While both of these are still nice they don’t hit the giddy heights of those perfectly poured cask versions.

Deeply Rich, no, moreishly nice, no....

Of course, having not had the cask version for a couple of years, it is still possible that I might not be as impressed with it now, as has happened with other enlightening beers over the years, but somehow I doubt that. I still enjoy the other versions immensely. At least they could give me the chance to be disappointed.

So my message to Fuller’s is to make this available on cask regularly. They could have it on at select pubs around London which have a lot of turnaround and advertise that these were the pubs where you could drink it. I’m sure they would get saddoes like myself making the trip for a pint or two. Or, as Steve Marriot once said, am I only dreaming?

He’s Selling Up!!

17 Apr

I’ve learned two interesting things recently. The first is that I’m a bit anal about people leaving kitchen unit doors open and the second is that our neighbour is selling up and moving on. No more sparks flying over the fence from his electric saw, no more screaming through the walls, no more carpets and bathroom cabinets left in the front garden, no more not so surreptitious phone conversations with lovers down the bottom of the garden, no more verbal abuse of his dog and no time left for him to concrete over his back garden, which I fear he surely would!

I think we might miss him. He’s a good sort really and you know what they say, be careful what you wish for….

Look what they’ve done to my beer, ma….

17 Apr

Lordy! Lordy! What HAS happened?

The excitement of finding the 330ml bottle, a more manageable quantity for a 7.2% beer, has given way to a touch of despair and incomprehensibility!! Can I say that word? Incomprehension doesn’t quite cut it somehow. Anyway, I opened a bottle of Brakspear Triple, which I was hoping I could savour and swirl and thrust under the professorette’s nose every two minutes, but was alarmed to find a very ‘wet’ tasting beer hiding out inside. Closer inspection revealed no yeast residue in the bottom of the bottle either. I tried a little more of it and again thought something quite essential was missing from this once classic ale! In the words of Melanie … it’s turning out all wrong!

What trickery is this?

Ils ont changé notre biere ma….. Ils ont changéeeeeee……. 

Cor Blimey!! Cockney Food Gone All Posh!

16 Apr

Didn’t we ‘ave a loverlee time!

Time was when these were a working man’s staple down in ‘ole London town. A little bit of malt vinegar and a toothpick to pull out the grit and you were away.

Dirty Whelks

Whelks are sea snails and grow around the coast of Britain and elsewhere and these days our whelks seem to have found themselves a market in South Korea. There is more information from the Marine Conservation Society here. I was actually unaware that there was any pressure on them when I bought this lot but still it’s a bit of a shame that there is no longer a natural market for them over here. Apart from some very good restaurants or the dying breed of cockney fish vans traditionally found in pub car parks, there doesn’t seem to be anything in between.

under water

I’ve eaten whelks but never cooked them. It always sounded like a bit too much effort. When I’ve had them before, they’ve been either very nice or very rubbery. Still, I couldn’t resist picking up some to see how they would turn out once placed in my foolish hands.

I said it sounded like a bit too much effort and I half still think that. Basically, this is because you have to clean the blighters forever to get rid of the grit.  Now, there is a man whose recipes I generally trust and who goes by the name of Mark Hix, you may have heard of him as he is quite famous over here, and I chose to follow a recipe of his from his book British Regional Food.

Basically, it’s a simple snails in garlic butter recipe but strike-a-light it was blummin’ long-winded. The first step was cleaning them as best you could, which I did. It has to be said they were quite dirty on the whole and it was good 10 minute job. I was glad the Profesorette wasn’t taken with the idea of having a serving or I would have had to have spent more time at the sink. They were then drained and put into a bowl with some salt and left for two hours. I was already bored by this stage but did eventually find something else to do to fill my time. After this step, you are supposed to leave them rinsing under the tap for 30 minutes but in these dry, dusty days of hose pipe bans I decided not to be quite so wasteful and just rinsed them in a couple of changes of water.

The next stage was creating the cooking liquor. 1 onion, 12 white peppercorns, fennel seeds, thyme , 1/2 lemon and some white wine were all put into a pan and the whelks were added. The pan was then topped up so they were covered with water and some salt added. This was brought to the boil before lowering the heat and simmering for 45 minutes. At this point, I was a bit worried that 45 minutes seemed a long time and that they would be sure to come out rubbery but, uncharacteristically perhaps, I stuck with the recipe.

After the 45 minutes, they were taken off the heat and allowed to cool down in the liquid for yet another hour, and to think I had originally planned to have them for breakfast! Fortunately, I was around the house most of the day yesterday so when they were cooled, I plucked them out of their shells and chopped them up, being sure to remove the foot and any grey sacks from them.

Whelks and Beer

The butter mixture was made with garlic chives, butter, lemon, salt and pepper and the meat was mixed into it. The shells were then given another clean and the mixture stuffed into them. Nearly there! Puff, deep breath!

Salt was spread along the bottom of an oven dish and the filled whelks were rested on this to prevent them slipping and the butter leaking out during baking. Needless to say, I didn’t quite get this right!

Just put the ruddy things in the oven!

Last bit!!!!! Into the oven at Gas 6/200C for 12-15 minutes and they were ready. Finally! It’s tiring me out just writing this.

Verdict/Conclusion: Really nice, better than garden snails and best of all I managed not to make them rubbery – take note Essex! However, I wish more restaurants and pubs would do them properly so I could eat more of them without having to hang around all day preparing them. Would I make them again? If I had a sous chef maybe.

Non-gritty, non-rubbery, cor blimey Whelks done all posh like!

When you don’t want to be in the pub

15 Apr

I didn’t choose the location to meet last night, nor would I have. It wasn’t a horrible pub, it was just that there wasn’t anything I wanted to drink, which made me feel a bit awkward. Most people I was with didn’t really care what they were drinking as long as it was alcohol of some description. I’m not drinking too much in one night these days so I personally like to make each drink count. For that to happen I need something with some degree of quality. This generally means good beer as there isn’t really room in my life for all the good beer there is in the world AND another alcoholic drink and of course beer is far more versatile than, say, wine is, so it fulfills most of my needs.

I’d almost forgotten that there were pubs where you can only buy rubbish. What was more galling last night was that every other establishment in the immediate vicinity had brilliant options! But Hey Ho, I wanted to be with the people I was with and they were content enough so I didn’t make a fuss. I sipped on the worst pint of beer that I’ve had in a long time. Called London’s Glory, it was anything but. It was in good condition but I can honestly say I have nothing positive to say about it at all, it was simply a waste of everybody’s time, money and effort. I didn’t finish it. Water was the better option. I don’t eat mini babybels so I’m not going to waste my time on crap beer.

Once I’d made up my mind that that was what I was going to do, I had an OK time despite the jibes from my mate Bob.

So where was this excuse for a pub? ……..The George Inn in London Bridge!!

This pub is actually a must see pub in London. It is owned by the National Trust and is the last surviving galleried coaching inn in London. There are parts of it where the likes of Dickens and Thackery would have sat and quaffed themselves into their top hats. There is one lovely room underneath the original galleries and if you enjoy wood, which I do, there is enough to hold your attention. I love the small corner seats which obviously date from a time before cellulite and there is also a tiny bar, which isn’t often open but is worth sticking your nose in to see the old-fashioned beer engine. On top of all this, there is a seated outdoor area, which in zone 1 is something of a rarity.

So, on the surface there is much to admire but quite honestly this venue depressed me. The place is a national treasure and should be great in all respects but just seems to exist because it can. Tourists will always pop in for the ‘pub experience.’ It is no surprise to find out that this is run by Greene King, who could do so much better with their other pubs scattered around the capital, or indeed the country, not to mention their woeful beer and food (I don’t include their XX Mild or Strong Suffolk Vintage Ale in this but you hardly ever see them so it doesn’t really matter!) We might as well have met in the park.

This pub is in dire need of some lovin’. If you are in the area, I recommend that you go there take a couple of photographs, look at the old beer engine, then bugger off elsewhere for some decent food and drink, you won’t have to go far!!

I’m a Sausage Fiend, Don’t You Know?!

14 Apr

When I moved house a couple of years ago, I didn’t just leave a little love nest behind, I left my local butcher behind too. He used to do the best pork and leek sausages of all time, in the world, ever, etc. While I found quite a decent butcher’s nearby, I was quite underwhelmed by their sausages. I took that as a challenge, bought my own mincer and have never looked back. If you don’t mind handling slippery meat, I thoroughly recommend you doing the same.

I’ve been doing them for a while now and have only ever had one ‘alright’ one. The rest have been immense, which I admit sounds a bit cocky but there’s nothing quite like pulling out your own sausage when people come round to eat. It impresses people no end for some reason. The feedback has been excellent so I’ve continued to do them, especially as they are so easy to do, even if they are a little labour intensive.

One of my fallback sausages is the Italian Spice sausage and here are two such sausages looking very happy together!

One of them is now sitting, even more happily, in my stomach. Somebody thank that pig!

I once enjoyed a Westmalle Dubbel with a spicy sausage in Bruges but alas, the two have never been seen in the house at the same time.

Just in case I make a foray into the sausage business* I won’t give you the precise measurements but because I’m feeling good today here are the ingredients:

Pork Shoulder, Pork Belly, Cold Red Wine, Parsley, Salt, Garlic, Cayenne, Fennel Seeds, Chilli, Paprika

*This is a lie actually. I just can’t remember them all off the top of my head!

Jackie Wilson said…..

14 Apr

……………. I’m in heaven when you smile!

A few things which made me smile today:

Apple Blossom

Looking forward to mine!

Underwood typewriter

Pic of a pic of Nag's Head Inn William Blunt

Wisteria Buds

 

And then it was time for an ale……

Cheese of the Moment #3

14 Apr

Well, it was a fine morning over here. Made even better by the farmers coming to town with their fine produce. Now, I’ve never been a massive fan of cheese with ‘stuff’ in it and I’ve always liked my cheeses more on the sharp side but this morning I was charmed, taken in by the moment.

The cheese I most enjoyed today was like a softish Cheddar with added garlic, herbs and cider in the mix. All of those ingredients I like so what my problem was with ‘stuff’ being in cheese, I’ll never know. It’s made by the Traditional Cheese Dairy from Sussex (again!) I think I like them. Herby, garlicky and a little cidery sweetness to boot. The photo will tell you more.

Give it up for ……….SUSSEX SCRUMPY!!!!

Info above

The Hit Parade

9 Apr

We all love a chart, don’t we? Top 5s, Top 10s… When I was younger the Top 30 (40) was so important to my life. Every Sunday evening the official music chart went out on BBC radio and I used to take it really personally if the song I liked at the time went down a few places. Now, I don’t even know if there is an official chart.  There is just music, isn’t there?

Lads mags and fashion mags are forever compiling Top 100s. Every time I log onto the Interwhatsit, Yahoo homepage is displaying a list of 10 things not to say to your lover while they have their nose in your fridge or 8 tell-tale signs that the person you are speaking to would really rather be looking at their iPhone.  Now, I would say that if you can’t beat them join them but clearly I joined many a moon ago, as evidenced elsewhere on this blog. Long before Nick Hornby released High Fidelity, we were all compiling our top 5 this and our top 5 that and top 5 the other. When I say ‘we’ I don’t necessarily include you. I refer to those of us who have shards of the obsessive coursing through our veins.

Well, I suppose I can’t keep ranting on like this without compiling another Top 5 of my own. Actually, in the interest of balance, why don’t I make that two Top 5s! Both are based on how much I enjoyment I gained from them on a particular occasion.

My top 5 foods enjoyed since finishing my detox!

  1. Spinach
  2. Venison Hearts
  3. Lord of the Hundreds Cheese
  4. Feta Cheese
  5. Pork Shank

My top 5 beers enjoyed since finishing my detox!

  1. Fuller’s Chiswick Bitter
  2. Ellezelloise Quintin Ambree
  3. Rothaus Pils
  4. Otley Thai-Bo
  5. Windsor & Eton Knight of the Garter

 

I might go away next Easter. I really do have too much time on my hands!!!!!